Members

An alphabetical list of members of the network. If no contact information is provided, please contact cdas@bath.ac.uk

GW4 Members

Members of the GW4 Network, June 2015

Dr Sally Anstey
Cardiff University

Dr. Sally Anstey received her doctorate from Cardiff University in 2012 and is currently a lecturer in the School of Healthcare Sciences. Her research, academic and clinical interests relate to cancer, palliative and end of life care (for those with a cancer and non-cancer diagnosis) the clinical experiences, confidence and competence of professionals specifically related to communication, ethical decision-making and supportive care. In relation to cancer care specifically involving patients (survivors), carers in the development, delivery and evaluation of health care education programmes.
Email: AnsteyS1@cardiff.ac.uk

Giles Birchley
University of Bristol

Giles has a professional background in children’s intensive care nursing and began working as an academic thanks to a Wellcome Trust fellowship in Ethics and Society. His PhD looked at how different stakeholder groups used the best interests standard to make decisions on behalf of critically ill young children.

He is based as the University of Bristol’s Centre for Ethics in Medicine, where he continues to pursue an interest in the processes and practices of medical decision-making for groups whose ability to make decisions on their own behalf are impaired.

Prof Linda Clare, Exeter Lead
University of Exeter

Linda Clare is Professor of Clinical Psychology of Ageing and Dementia at the University of Exeter, where she leads the Centre for Research in Ageing and Cognitive Health (REACH) within the School of Psychology. Her research aims to improve the lives of older people and people with dementia through a focus on promoting well-being, preventing or reducing age-related disability, and improving rehabilitation and care.
Email: c/o cdas@bath.ac.uk

Geraldine Cooney
University of Bath

Geraldine is an experienced qualitative researcher, having worked for many years in the charity sector, often on sensitive research topics. Her interest in this area grew as she project managed a study on end of life issues for the Motor Neurone Disease Association, worked with young people and their families in a number of children’s hospices, and collected Patient Stories for memory services and palliative care services. Her current role is Patient and Public Involvement Research Co-ordinator, based at the University of Bath, where she facilitates and supports members of the public and researchers in meaningful collaboration to ensure research is relevant and likely to have impact.
Email: G.Cooney@bath.ac.uk
Web: http://www.bath.ac.uk/brd

Dr Jeremy Dixon, Bath Lead
University of Bath

Dr Jeremy Dixon is a lecturer in social work at the Department of Social and Policy Sciences at the University of Bath. He is a board member of the International Sociological Associations Research Committee for the Sociology of Mental Health and Illness and also continues to practice as a mental health social worker. Jeremy is interested in looking at the way in which individuals with early-stage dementia make decisions about their future care and financial arrangement both informally and through the Mental Capacity Act 2005. He is keen to explore the experiences of carers and to look for ways in which they might be better supported.
Email: j.dixon2@bath.ac.uk

Dr Michelle Farr
University of Bath

Dr Michelle Farr is an experienced researcher in healthcare improvement. Her recent research has included:
1) How to support healthcare staff in the social and emotional aspects of care-giving. This partnership project with the Point of Care Foundation investigated how Schwartz Rounds can be implemented in mental health and community services.
2) How families and patients can collaborate with health and social care staff to improve services using experience-based co-design, patient narratives and action research.
3) Post-Francis, where care was ignored in the rush to meet targets, how can organisations be re-organised on the basis of the logic of care?
E-mail: m.farr@bath.ac.uk

Prof Richard Huxtable, Bristol Lead
University of Bristol

Richard Huxtable is Professor of Medical Ethics & Law and the Director of the Centre for Ethics in Medicine, University of Bristol, UK. Author of Law, Ethics and Compromise at the Limits of Life: To Treat or not to Treat? (Routledge, 2012), Euthanasia, Ethics & the Law: From Conflict to Compromise (Routledge, 2007), joint editor of The Voices and Rooms of European Bioethics (Routledge, 2015) and co-author of the second edition of The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook (Cambridge University Press, 2010), he has published widely in bioethics and medical law, particularly on end-of-life decision making and surgical ethics. Richard is also a trustee of the National Council for Palliative Care and the UK Clinical Ethics Network, as well as vice-chair (education) of Bristol’s Clinical Ethics Advisory Group.
Email: R.Huxtable@bristol.ac.uk

Prof Malcolm Johnson
University of Bath

Malcolm Johnson is currently Visiting Professor of Gerontology and End of Life Care at the University of Bath, has been Professor of Health and Social Policy at the University of Bristol (now Emeritus) since 1995. From 1984 – 95 he was Professor of Health and Social Welfare and subsequently first Dean of the School of Health and Social Welfare at the Open University. His research and academic interests are wide, including the social aspects of health and illness, biographical studies, social policy analysis, death and dying and his major specialism, ageing and the lifespan. Of his eleven books and over 160 monographs, chapters and articles, more than half relate to ageing. He is a former Secretary of the BSA Medical Sociology Group and the British Society of Gerontology and Founding Editor of the international journal Ageing and Society. He is Director of the International Institute on Health and Ageing.

Professor Johnson’s research and consultancy includes extensive work (with a variety of agencies including The States of Jersey, MHA Care Group, BUPA Care, Anchor Trust, Barchester Healthcare, Pocklington Trust, St Monica Trust, amongst others) on the long term care and the domiciliary care of older people. He is an expert on assessment issues.  Over the past fifteen years he has extended into death and dying and end of life care and the development of good practice in that field. A five year development consultancy with Anchor Trust won the 2007 Independent Healthcare Innovation in Long Term Care Award and was Runner-up in the 2007 Guardian Public Service Award for Care of Older People.
Email: m.l.johnson@bath.ac.uk

Dr Kerry Jones
University of Exeter

Dr Kerry Jones is a Research Fellow in Health Services Research at the University of Exeter Medical School and also lectures in Medical Sociology death, dying and ageing on the BMBS course for medical students. More recently Kerry conducted a realist evaluation of a Dementia Support in the southwest and on the challenges clinicians face in initiating end of life conversations on end of life care. Kerry’s previous research has focused on psychotherapy for people with dementia as well as technology and assistive devices for people with dementia. Kerry has a consultancy providing training for health and social care professional’s involved with death, dying and end of life care.
Email: k.s.jones@exeter.ac.uk

Prof Jenny Kitzinger, Cardiff lead
Cardiff University

Jenny Kitzinger is particularly interested in how decisions are made to give life-sustaining treatment to individuals in prolonged vegetative and minimally conscious states. A key concern is how consideration is given to ‘prior expressed wishes’ in best interests decision-making (under the Mental Capacity Act 2005). She curated the Cardiff ‘Before I Die’ festival in 2013 and has a long-standing interest in risk decision-making and the social and ethical dimensions of technology alongside health communication/representation issues.
Email: KitzingerJ@cardiff.ac.uk

Jana Kralova
University of Bath

Jana is becoming a sociologist with an interest in the concept of social death. Starting with old age and end of life care her theoretical work on social death  has developed to explore the quality of life and death of the socially abandoned and discriminated against, whether due to their race, origin, gender, religion, physical/mental impairment, economic failure, political positioning or a combination of these. Jana is very passionate about preventing social death through engaged research. She is also the winner of the first prize for research poster showcase at South West Doctoral Training Centre and is currently doing doctoral research at the Centre for Death and Society.
Email: J.Kralova@bath.ac.uk

Julie Latchem
Cardiff University

Julie has a background as a practising neurological physiotherapist. Her research is motivated by her experiences of treating and caring for people with neurological conditions and managing health care professional teams. Her recent work focusses on the care and therapeutic treatment experiences of people with severe brain injuries and the relationships between them, their families and health care staff.

Recently, she’s considered how families of people in prolonged disorders of consciousness talk about the future and how these families perceive the physiotherapy their relatives receive. This work has highlighted some of what time and futures can tell us about patient, family and health care staff relations in the present – for example, what physiotherapeutic treatments or their withdrawal signals to families and tells them about both the current state of their relative and their future.

Her doctoral research explores the everyday of brain injury rehabilitation delivered in the independent sector. By paying attention to the temporal she’s seeking to show how neurological care and rehabilitation is shaping the lives of patients and their families – and is critical to understanding care relations in the present.
Latest publication: Latchem, J., Kitzinger, J. and Kitzinger, C. (2015) Physiotherapy for vegetative and minimally conscious state patients: family perceptions and experiences. Disability & Rehabilitation Early Online pp.1-18
Email: LatchemJM@cardiff.ac.uk

Liz Lloyd
University of Bristol

Liz Lloyd is an experienced researcher in gerontology. Her primary interest is in the end of life in old age and in the provision of care and support when health declines. Liz recently completed a project on Dignity in Later Life and is working on ideas about identities in the fourth age. As part of an international team, she is currently researching the potential of care homes to be a positive choice rather than a last resort for living and dying.
Email: Liz.Lloyd@bristol.ac.uk

Dr Sara MacBride-Stewart
Cardiff University

Dr Sara MacBride-Stewart is engaged in interdisciplinary work, often working closely with medics to develop understandings about the development of professional identities in the transforming world of work and healthcare. She is interested in patient perspectives and the psychosocial dimensions of health care issues; affective health care organization and policy, equality (social and socio-legal aspects). She enjoys what a critical social theory approach can offer in terms of the complexity and the opportunities it provides to give status to marginalised or non-normative accounts. Her knowledge has been developed through a conglomeration of queer, feminist and embodied theories because she has found this a useful toolkit for a discussion about the intersections between regulation, subjectivity, materiality, temporality, and affect in a range of policy, healthcare and medical education settings
Email: Macbride-StewartS@cardiff.ac.uk

Prof Randall Smith
University of Brsitol

Randall Smith, Professor of Social Gerontology, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol. Officially retired in 2001, but still active as a Senior Research Fellow. Long standing interest in social and community care, with a particular focus on the older population. In recent years worked mainly on residential care and extra care housing. Current projects include healthy ageing in residential places (Liz Lloyd,PI) and the contribution of social care to the quality of life of residents in extra care housing(Simon Evans, Association for Dementia Studies, Worcester University)
Email: Randall.Smith@bristol.ac.uk

Dr Stuart Todd
University of South Wales

I am a sociologist by training, and my entire academic life has been concerned with the meaning of learning disability in terms of identity and life consequences. More latterly this has focused on the relationship between learning disability, death and dying. My past research has looked this relationship from the point of view of people with learning disabilities, family carers and service professionals. My current research in collaboration with academics across the UK and Ireland, and in particular with the University of Southampton has focused on the last months of life of people with learning disabilities living in services. To date data have been obtained on the recent deaths of 240 people with learning disabilities. An award has just also been awarded to extend this study into long term care settings ( not exclusively for people with LD). Finally with a colleague I am looking at the last years of life and final resting place of people with LD who lived in a long stay English institution between 1918 and 1940.
Email: stuart.todd@southwales.ac.uk

Dr Christine Valentine
University of Bath

Christine Valentine is a sociologist and member of the University of Bath’s Centre for Death and Society. She has researched and published widely on the social and cultural aspects of bereavement in Britain and Japan, on funeral welfare systems for people on low income both nationally and internationally, and on funeral directing in the 21st century. She is currently involved in a large, collaborative, ESRC funded study of bereavement after a drug or alcohol-related death. This study has engaged bereaved people and a range of practitioners in developing best practice guidelines for improving the way services respond to these bereaved people. In view of what she has learned from interviewing bereaved people and her recent experience of poor decision making in relation to her mother’s EoL care, she is concerned about the impact of current EoL policy and practice, not only on the dying but also those who are left behind.
Email: c.a.valentine@bath.ac.uk

Prof Tony Walter
University of Bath

Currently director of the University of Bath’s Centre for Death and Society (CDAS), I am a sociologist who has researched social aspects of death, dying and bereavement over 25 years. Most end of life (EoL) research, practice, philosophy and now strategy (eg DoH EoL Care Strategy) is based on the palliative care and hospice movement’s experience of 2nd/3rd agers with cancer, and it is only in the past couple of years that practitioners and policy makers are asking how relevant this experience is for people dying in late old age with multiple health issues often including dementia. This is a challenge
Email: jaw34@bath.ac.uk

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